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ABC Hawaii is proud to train in five trades:

Carpentry

Carpentry Apprenticeship Program

About The Program

carpentry apprentices earn competitive wages and benefits while working on the job. Depending on the training period an apprentice’s wages are based on a percentage of the journeyperson rate for public works projects or a wage survey for non-public works jobs.

The Carpentry Apprenticeship Training Program encompasses a minimum of four years and 8,000 hours of on‐the‐job training. Applicants, who can document prior experience, may be eligible to take a placement test and could potentially begin their apprenticeship training program at a higher class year.

A normal workweek is 40 hours. However, due to the nature of this industry, hours may be more or less depending upon weather conditions, other trades, job delays or other unforeseen situations. Apprentices should be prepared to travel to job sites. Dependable transportation and a valid driver's license are
required.

apprentices attend school 2 nights a week, 2 semesters a year (Fall and Spring) for 4 years. Apprentices may also be required to attend scheduled Saturday classes throughout the year. In class, instructors teach practical application and theory. In addition, demonstrations and “hands‐on” instruction are
conducted on safe and proper methods.

After completing ABC Hawaii’s apprenticeship program, graduates receive a certificate of completion from the State of Hawaii and the US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship. More importantly, they will have the skills and credentials necessary to succeed in today’s competitive workforce.

Because of the length of the program, commitment to the classroom and on‐the‐job performance requirements, one should be passionate about and dedicated to their chosen trade. When making selection decisions, looks for candidates who want to become career carpenters.

Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) developed the apprenticeship programs to help meet construction industry demands for skilled craftspeople. The Carpentry Apprenticeship Program is accredited by the State of Hawaii, and the US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship. ABC’s apprenticeship programs help contractors maintain a safe and skilled workforce. With
competition as stiff as it is today, quality performance is critical in order to bring construction projects in on time and under budget.

About The Carpentry Trade

  • Constructs, erects, and installs, and repairs structures and fixtures made of wood, plywood, and wallboard using hand and power tools. Verify trueness of structure with plumb bob and carpenter’s level.
  • Studies blueprints, sketches and building plans for information pertaining to required materials and dimension of structure or fixture to be fabricated. Selects specified type of lumber or other building materials.
  • Prepares layouts, using rule, framing square, chalk and making gauge.
  • Shape materials to prescribed measurements using saws, chisels and planes. Assemble cut and shaped materials, fastening them with nails, dowel pins or glue.
  • Lays hardwood, parquet, and wood-strip-block floors by nailing floors to sub-floor or cementing them to mastic or asphalt base. Apply shock-absorbing, sound-deadening, and decorative paneling to ceilings and walls.
  • Fits and installs prefabricated window frames, doors, door frames, weather stripping, interior and exterior trim, and finish hardware, such as locks, letter drops and kick plates.
  • Constructs forms and chutes for pouring concrete. Erect scaffolding and ladders for assembling structures above ground level. Weld parts to steel structural members.

Electrical

Electrical Apprenticeship Program

About The Program

electrical apprentices earn competitive wages and benefits while working on the job. Depending on the training period an apprentice’s wages are based on a percentage of the journeyperson rate for public works projects or a wage survey for non-public works jobs.

The Electrical Apprenticeship Training Program encompasses a minimum of five years and 10,000 hours of on‐the‐job training. Applicants, who can document prior experience, may be eligible to take a placement test and could potentially begin their apprenticeship training program at a higher class year.

A normal workweek is 40 hours. However, due to the nature of this industry, hours may be more or less depending upon weather conditions, other trades, job delays or other unforeseen situations. Apprentices should be prepared to travel to job sites. Dependable transportation and a valid driver's license are
required.

apprentices attend school 2 nights a week, 2 semesters a year (Fall and Spring) for 5 years. Apprentices may also be required to attend scheduled Saturday classes throughout the year. In class, instructors teach practical application and theory. In addition, demonstrations and “hands‐on” instruction are
conducted on safe and proper methods.

After completing ABC Hawaii’s apprenticeship program, graduates receive certificate of completion from the State of Hawaii and the US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship. More importantly, they will have the skills and credentials necessary to succeed in today’s competitive workforce.

Because of the length of the program, commitment to the classroom and on‐the‐job performance requirements, one should be passionate about and dedicated to their chosen trade. When making selection decisions, looks for candidates who want to become career electricians.

Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) developed the apprenticeship programs to help meet construction industry demands for skilled craftspeople. The Electrical Apprenticeship Program is accredited by the State of Hawaii, and the US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship. ABC’s apprenticeship programs help contractors maintain a safe and skilled workforce. With
competition as stiff as it is today, quality performance is critical in order to bring construction projects in on time and under budget.

About The Trade
  • Consistent with applicable codes, specifications and safety standards, plan, layout, install and repair
  • wiring-electrical fixtures, apparatus and control equipment.
  • Plan new or modified installations, minimizing waste of materials, providing access for future
  • maintenance, avoiding unsightly, hazardous and unreliable wiring.
  • Prepare sketches showing location of wiring and equipment or follows diagrams or blueprints to ensure that concealed wiring is installed before completion of walls, ceilings or flooring.
  • Measure, cut, bend, thread, assemble and install electrical conduit using tools such as a hacksaw,
  • pipe-threader and conduit bender.
  • Pull wiring through conduit, splices wires by stripping insulation from terminal leads (using knife or
  • pliers), twisting wires together, and applying tape or terminal caps.
  • Connect wiring to lighting fixtures and power equipment, using hand tools.
  • Install distribution controls (e.g., switches, relays, circuit-breaker panels), fastening in place with screws or bolts using hand and power tools. Connect power leads.
  • Test continuity of circuit to ensure electrical compatibility and safety of components using testing instruments (e.g., ohmmeter, battery and buzzer, and oscilloscope). Observes functioning of installed equipment or system, detect hazards and need for adjustments, relocation, or replacement. May repair faulty equipment or systems.

Painting

Painting Apprenticeship Program

About The Program

Painting apprentices earn competitive wages and benefits while working on the job. Depending on the training period an apprentice’s wages are based on a percentage of the journeyperson rate for public works projects or a wage survey for non-public works jobs.

The Painting Apprenticeship Training Program encompasses a minimum of three years and 8,000 hours of on‐the‐job training. Applicants, who can document prior experience, may be eligible to take a placement test and could potentially begin their apprenticeship training program at a higher class year.

A normal workweek is 40 hours. However, due to the nature of this industry, hours may be more or less depending upon weather conditions, other trades, job delays or other unforeseen situations. Apprentices should be prepared to travel to job sites. Dependable transportation and a valid driver's license are required.

Apprentices attend school twice a week during, 2 semesters a year (Fall and Spring) for 3 years.   In class, instructors teach practical application and theory. In addition, demonstrations and “hands‐on” instruction are conducted on safe and proper methods.

After completing ABC Hawaii’s apprenticeship program, graduates receive a certificate of completion from the State of Hawaii and the US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship. More importantly, they will have the skills and credentials necessary to succeed in today’s competitive workforce.

Because of the length of the program, commitment to the classroom and on‐the‐job performance requirements, one should be passionate about and dedicated to their chosen trade. When making selection decisions, looks for candidates who want to become career painters.

Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) developed the apprenticeship programs to help meet construction industry demands for skilled craftspeople. The Painting Apprenticeship Program is accredited by the State of Hawaii, and the US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship. ABC’s apprenticeship programs help contractors maintain a safe and skilled workforce. With competition as
stiff as it is today, quality performance is critical in order to bring construction projects in on time and under budget.

About The Painting Trade
  • Preparation of Surfaces, how to identify types of surfaces used in construction including wood, metal, masonry/concrete, plaster/drywall and synthetic substrates.
  • Safety with the use of ladders, scaffolds, lifts, and fall protection
  • To identify and utilize the different sealants and repair fillers, paints and coatings
  • Explain the benefits and usages of several types of applications using brushing, rolling and spray methodologies

Plumbing

Plumbing Program

About The Program

plumbing apprentices earn competitive wages and benefits while working on the job. Depending on the training period an apprentice’s wages are based on a percentage of the journeyperson rate for public works projects or a wage survey for non-public works jobs.

Plumbing Apprenticeship Training Program encompasses a minimum of five years and 10,000 hours of on‐the‐job training. Applicants, who can document prior experience, may be eligible to take a placement test and could potentially begin their apprenticeship training program at a higher class year.

A normal workweek is 40 hours. However, due to the nature of this industry, hours may be more or less depending upon weather conditions, other trades, job delays or other unforeseen situations. Apprentices should be prepare to travel to job sites. Dependable transportation and a valid driver's license are
required.

apprentices attend school 2 nights a week, 2 semesters a year (Fall and Spring) for 5 years. Apprentices may also be required to attend scheduled Saturday classes throughout the year. In class, instructors teach practical application and theory. In addition, demonstrations and “hands‐on” instruction are conducted on safe and proper methods.

After completing ABC Hawaii’s apprenticeship program, graduates receive certificate of completion from the State of Hawaii and the US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship. More importantly, they will have the skills and credentials necessary to succeed in today’s competitive workforce.

Because of the length of the program, commitment to the classroom and on‐the‐job performance requirements, one should be passionate about and dedicated to their chosen trade. When making selection decisions, looks for candidates who want to become career plumbers.

Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) developed the apprenticeship programs to help meet construction industry demands for skilled craftspeople. The Plumbing Apprenticeship Program is accredited by the State of Hawaii, and the US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship. ABC’s apprenticeship programs help contractors maintain a safe and skilled workforce. With
competition as stiff as it is today, quality performance is critical in order to bring construction projects in on time and under budget.

About The Trade
  • Consistent with applicable code, specifications and safety standards, assembles, installs and repairs popes and valve fittings composed of metals (e.g., iron, steel, brass or lead) and nonmetals (e.g., glass, vitrified clay, plastic) using hand and power tools.
  • Install and repair plumbing fixtures (e.g. sinks, commodes, bathtubs, water heaters, hot water tanks,
  • garbage disposal units, dishwashers, water softeners). Study building plans and working drawings to determine work aids required and sequence of installation.
  • Inspect structures to ascertain obstructions to be avoided to prevent weakening of structure resulting from installation of pipe.
  • Locate and mark position for pipe and pipe connections and passage holes for pipes in walls and floors, using ruler, spirit level and plumb bob. Cut openings in walls and floors to accommodate pipe and pipe fitting using hand and power tools.
  • Cut and thread pipe, using pipe cutters, cutting torch, and pipe-threading machine. Bends pipe to required angle by hand or using pipe-bending machine.
  • Join pipes by use of screws, bolts, fittings, solder, plastic solvent, caulk joints. Weld holding fixtures to steel structural members.
  • Fill pipe system with water or air; reads pressure gauges to determine whether systems are leaking.
  • Repair and maintain plumbing systems by replacing washers in leaky faucets, mending burst pipes and open clogged drains.

Roofing

Roofing Apprenticeship Program

About The Program

Roofing apprentices earn competitive wages and benefits while working on the job. Depending on the training period an apprentice’s wages are based on a percentage of the journeyperson rate for public works projects or a wage survey for non-public works jobs.

The Roofing Apprenticeship Training Program encompasses a minimum of three years and 7,000 hours of on‐the‐job training. Applicants, who can document prior experience, may be eligible to take a placement test and could potentially begin their apprenticeship training program at a higher class year.

A normal workweek is 40 hours. However, due to the nature of this industry, hours may be more or less depending upon weather conditions, other trades, job delays or other unforeseen situations. Apprentices should be prepared to travel to job sites. Dependable transportation and a valid driver's license are required.

Apprentices attend school on Saturdays, 2 semesters a year (Fall and Spring) for 3 years.   In class, instructors teach practical application and theory. In addition, demonstrations and “hands‐on” instruction are conducted on safe and proper methods.

After completing ABC Hawaii’s apprenticeship program, graduates receive a certificate of completion from the State of Hawaii and the US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship. More importantly, they will have the skills and credentials necessary to succeed in today’s competitive workforce.

Because of the length of the program, commitment to the classroom and on‐the‐job performance requirements, one should be passionate about and dedicated to their chosen trade. When making selection decisions, looks for candidates who want to become career roofers.

Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC) developed the apprenticeship programs to help meet construction industry demands for skilled craftspeople. The Roofing Apprenticeship Program is accredited by the State of Hawaii, and the US Department of Labor, Office of Apprenticeship. ABC’s apprenticeship programs help contractors maintain a safe and skilled workforce. With competition as
stiff as it is today, quality performance is critical in order to bring construction projects in on time and under budget.

About The Roofing Trade
  • General Carrying and placing materials for use by journeyworker, material handling, setting up a job site, cleaning up jobsite, hoisting, loading and unloading and unloading all materials and tools.
  • Built-up roofing, tar, asphalt and general work Preparing materials, equipment; regulating and heat of pitch and asphalt, preparing roof surfaces for covering, apply pitch or asphalt to roof, prepare, cut place, fit trim strips to felt, tar paper, roofing paper or insulating board to roof, apply additional layers of roofing material to roof as required, cement tar paper with hot tar, or asphalt or flashing cement, evenly distribute crushed gravel or slag over top coat or tar or asphalt, properly install gravel stop, scuppers, roof drains, etc. Properly flash all curbs, parapets and other openings in roof.
  • Shingle work Asphalt shingles and 90# roll roofing, cover roof sheathing with felt, nail shingles, provide for proper overlap, cut shingles to fit ridges, valleys and edges, apply flashing, cleaning complete job.
  • Other Materials Felt, wood, coal, oil, lumber, roofing paper, insulation board, pitch, flashing
    cement, gravel or slag, tile blocks, cement mortar, grout, water, dilute acid solution, asphalt, roofing cement, slate, terra cotta, asbestos shingles, wood shakes, roofing felt, sheet metal flashing and all other materials awarded to the roofer’s jurisdiction.
  • Tools and equipment Axe, ladders, iron buckets, hoist, heater, scaffolding, nails, hatchet, saw, knife, dipper, cotton mop, scoop shovel, bucket, rake, stiff bristled broom, ladder rule, trowel, hammer, level, straight-edge, roofer’s hammer, punch, pliers, roofer’s take, chalf line, paper cutter, rule and other tools.